The Zen of python, also known as Pep-20 is a collection of twenty principles that influences the development in python, by Tim Peters. You can view this on a python shell by importing this by typing command import this on a python shell.

The Zen of Python, by Tim Peters

  1. Beautiful is better than ugly.
  2. Explicit is better than implicit.
  3. Simple is better than complex.
  4. Complex is better than complicated.
  5. Flat is better than nested.
  6. Sparse is better than dense.
  7. Readability counts.
  8. Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.
  9. Although practicality beats purity.
  10. Errors should never pass silently.
  11. Unless explicitly silenced.
  12. In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.
  13. There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.
  14. Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.
  15. Now is better than never.
  16. Although never is often better than *right* now.
  17. If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.
  18. If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.
  19. Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

On the other hand Daniel Greenfeld cameup wuth "Anti-Zen of Python" which are opposit of these principles. You can view it on your shell by importing that using command import that. The package that is not distributed with standard python. You have to install it from pip with command pip install that

The Anti-Zen of Python, by Daniel Greenfeld

  1. Ugly is better than beautiful.
  2. Implicit is better than explicit.
  3. Complicated is better than complex.
  4. Complex is better than simple.
  5. Nested is better than flat.
  6. Dense is better than sparse.
  7. Line code counts.
  8. Special cases are special enough to break the rules.
  9. Although purity beats practicality.
  10. Errors should always pass silently.
  11. Spelchek iz fur loosers.
  12. In the face of ambiguity, one guess is as good as another.
  13. There should be many ways to do it.
  14. Because only a tiny minority of us are Dutch.
  15. Get things running, then fix them later.
  16. If the implementation is hard to explain, it's enterprisey.
  17. If the implementation is easy to explain, it won't take enough time to do.
  18. Namespaces are too hard, just use "from module import *"!

>>> import this
The Zen of Python, by Tim Peters

Beautiful is better than ugly.
Explicit is better than implicit.
Simple is better than complex.
Complex is better than complicated.
Flat is better than nested.
Sparse is better than dense.
Readability counts.
Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.
Although practicality beats purity.
Errors should never pass silently.
Unless explicitly silenced.
In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.
There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.
Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.
Now is better than never.
Although never is often better than *right* now.
If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.
If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.
Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!



>>> import that
The Anti-Zen of Python, by Daniel Greenfeld

Ugly is better than beautiful.
Implicit is better than explicit.
Complicated is better than complex.
Complex is better than simple.
Nested is better than flat.
Dense is better than sparse.
Line code counts.
Special cases are special enough to break the rules.
Although purity beats practicality.
Errors should always pass silently.
Spelchek iz fur loosers.
In the face of ambiguity, one guess is as good as another.
There should be many ways to do it.
Because only a tiny minority of us are Dutch.
Get things running, then fix them later.
If the implementation is hard to explain, it's enterprisey.
If the implementation is easy to explain, it won't take enough time to do.
Namespaces are too hard, just use "from module import *"!